Got Homework? Use Hot Topics


browse by subjectStart with the Homework Resources subject on the main Hot Topics page.  Here you will find Hot Topics on a variety of subjects including art, language arts, science, mathematics, social studies, history, geography, literature and more! The Librarians have pulled together library databases, Always Available eBooks (reference books you can access 24/7 365 days a year!), videos, live tutoring helping (for FREE!), vetted websites, magazines, newspapers and much more.

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You have Devices. We have eBooks.


banner devicesLVCCLD has been selected to participate in the March Circulation Record contest that our eBook vendor OverDrive is holding starting today through March 31st.  This is an exclusive test promotion for a small group of OverDrive VIP partners.

If LVCCLD sets a daily circulation record on any day between March 26th and March 31st, we will be entered into an drawing with a chance to win one of two fantastic prizes.  In order to participate in the raffle, we are competing to beat our own library’s daily circulation!

What we need for you to do is checkout eBooks, eAudios, eMusic or eVideos starting today through March 31 from our eMedia Catalog. So get your Library card out and find something good to read!

How to Download eBooks 101 – Revised


ilovetoread_posterWith our new eMedia Catalog, the procedure for checking eBooks and eAudio Books out has changed along with adding new features, so we have updated our eBook Downloading 101 – 2013 workbook. These directions are for all devices with the exception of iOS devices. iPad, iPhone, iPod users need to continue to use the eBook Downloading for iOS Devices.

In addition, this week we will have a new log in method. You will no longer need to select the Library District. You will just enter your Library Card number and  zip code. We hope this makes it easier to access your eMedia Account especially on mobile devices.

K-12 Students Excel with School eBooks


kids favorites2In a recent post by OverDrive they talk about a recent eBook study done in Australia. The study engaged Australian students with eBooks conducted by the New South Wales Department of Education and Communities and OverDrive reseller Softlink.

Here are the key findings:

  • 41% of student respondents indicated they were reading more than usual by the end of the project
  • 47% of teacher respondents indicated students were enjoying reading more, with 21% believing reading skills were improved
  • 100% of parents/carers expressed desire for ongoing access to eBooks
  • Teachers and teacher librarians saw the greatest benefit was in reading comprehension
  • Students believed using eBooks improved their writing and creativity, and reading independently
  • The benefits of using eBooks are more far reaching than developing confidence using technology
  • The most common devices used for accessing eBooks were school computers, iPads, iPods and home computers.
  • The opportunity to access a range of eBooks enriched the collection of resources available to students and teachers.
  • Reading and writing enjoyment and skills development was evidenced by quality student work samples and feedback resulting from the planned learning activities.

To read more about the study see the original article.

To see our collection of eBooks for doing homework or for reading pleasure visit these sites:

Kids are Reading More with eReaders


kids favorites2From a blog post on No Shelf Required

Scholastic recently released a new study on kid’s reading in the digital age. The study found that kids reading of ebooks has nearly doubled since 2010. Full details are on the Scholastic site or you can download the full report with appendices here.

Below are some highlights of the study from the Scholastic site:

Kids, Families, and eBooks

  • The percent of children who have read an ebook has almost doubled since 2010 (25% vs. 46%).
  • Among children who have read an ebook, one in five says he/she is reading more books for fun; boys are more likely to agree than girls (26% vs. 16%).
  • Half of children age 9–17 say they would read more books for fun if they had greater access to ebooks – a 50% increase since 2010.
  • Seventy-five percent of kids who have read an ebook are reading ebooks at home, with about one in four reading them at school.
  • Seventy-two percent of parents are interested in having their child read ebooks.
  • Eighty percent of kids who read ebooks still read books for fun primarily in print.
  • Kids say that ebooks are better than print books when they do not want their friends to know what they are reading, and when they are out and about/traveling; print is better for sharing with friends and reading at bedtime.
  • Fifty-eight percent of kids age 9–17 say they will always want to read books printed on paper even though there are ebooks available – a slight decrease from 2010 (66%).

Kids’ Reading Frequency and Attitudes toward Reading

  • Among girls, there has been a decline since 2010 in frequent readers (42% vs. 36%), reading enjoyment (71% vs. 66%), and the importance of reading books for fun (62% vs. 56%).
  • Compared to 2010, boys are more likely to think reading books for fun is important (39% in 2010 vs. 47% in 2012), but they still lag girls on this measure (47% for boys in 2012 vs. 56% for girls in 2012).
  • Frequency of reading books for fun is significantly lower for kids age 12–17 than for children age 6–11; frequency of reading books for school is also lower for kids age 12–17 than for kids age 6–11.

Parents’ Role in Kids’ Reading Practice

  • About half of parents (49%) feel their children do not spend enough time reading books for fun, while the vast majority of parents think their children spend too much time playing video games or visiting social networking sites.
  • The percentage of parents who say their child does not spend enough time reading for fun has increased since 2010 across all age groups of children (36% in 2010 to 49% in 2012).
  • Having reading role-model parents or a large book collection at home has more of an impact on kids’ reading frequency than does household income.
  • Building reading into kids’ schedules and regularly bringing additional books into the home for children positively impact kids’ reading frequency.

Summer Reading

  • Ninety-nine percent of parents think children their child’s age should read over the summer.
  • Eighty-six percent of children say they read a book (or books) over the summer.
  • On average, kids say they read 12 books over the summer.