Did you know these seven little facts about Dinosaurs?

dinosaurs2Here are some interesting facts about our mighty beast friends that you might not have known:

The Name: The name dinosaur comes from the term Dinosauria, which means terribly great lizards. But dinosaurs were not lizards, only distantly related to them, and most were not very terrible.

Dino Intelligence: One of the most intelligent dinosaurs was a small, bipedal theropod called Troodon. Troodon‘s brain was as large, compared with its body weight, as that of many modern birds and small mammals. It had excellent vision and probably hunted for mammals and other prey at night.

Millions of Years: Dinosaurs lived throughout most of the Mesozoic Era, which is divided into three periods—Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous. The Triassic Period lasted from about 250 million to 200 million years ago. The Jurassic Period lasted from about 200 million to 145 million years ago, and the Cretaceous Period from about 145 million to 65 million years ago.

From Birth To Death: Scientists do not know how all dinosaurs reproduced and can only guess how long dinosaurs lived. Fossil dinosaur eggs show that at least some dinosaurs laid hard-shelled eggs, as do modern alligators. They can estimate the time it took for dinosaurs to grow to adult size; studies of the microscopic structure of dinosaur bones suggest that dinosaurs grew rapidly.

Very First Findings: Before the 1800’s, no one knew that dinosaurs had ever existed. People who found a dinosaur tooth or bone did not know what it was. However, around 1818, an English scholar, William Buckland, obtained a large lower jaw that contained a number of sharp teeth. After studying this jaw, Buckland came to the conclusion that it was unlike any fossil previously discovered. So he gave it a new name, Megalosaurus(great lizard), in 1824.

The Mysterious T-Rex: Early scientists first thought this giant meat-eater was primarily a scavenger, feeding only on the decaying bodies of dead dinosaurs. They also thought it lived a sluggish life, sleeping or basking in the sun between meals. However, scientists gradually came to believe that Tyrannosaurushad a much more dynamic lifestyle and argue that it was an active predator as well as a scavenger.

The Disappearance: There are many developed theories that explain dinosaur extinction. Two of the major theories involve 1) the collision of an asteroid with Earth and 2) large volcanic eruptions in what is now India.

Learn all about dinosaurs with World Book for Kids and Hot Topic – Dinosaurs and Early Animals.  Remember to count your minutes for Club Read!

#SummerLearning loss is a significant contributor to the #AchievementGap. #KeepKidsLearning

summer learning dayToday is Summer Learning Day! #KeepKidsLearning attend a library program or visit Hot Topic – Club Read Kids or Hot Topic – Club Read Teens for some fun activities or a good book to read! Pledge to keep kids learning http://bit.ly/SLDPledge

If you can’t drive the car, you can at least speak the language!

can't drive the car speak the languagePlanning a trip to Italy to celebrate your anniversary? Collaborating with your Chinese counterparts in your company’s Beijing branch? Just want to brush up that language you studied for four years in school but somehow can’t seem to remember at all? We’ve got you covered.

Transparent Language Online is now Available for FREE with your library card.  Whether you’re starting at the very beginning with a new alphabet or you’re an intermediate learner looking to enhance your vocabulary and grammar knowledge, Transparent Language Online can help. Available for learning 95+ languages, plus English as a Second Language (ESL) materials for native speakers of 26+ languages, the program has something for everyone:

  • Alphabet Courses: Full-length alphabet courses are available for 18+ languages to familiarize you with new writing systems, empowering you to learn one (or more!) of those “intimidating” languages like Mandarin Chinese, Hindi, or Arabic.
  • Essentials Courses: These courses guide you through 30+ lessons of pure language fundamentals, including meeting and greeting, expressing wants and needs, planning for a trip, dealing with money, asking for help, and beyond.
  • Supplemental Vocabulary: Hundreds of topically-organized vocabulary lists will teach you thousands of new words and phrases through a completely redesigned suite of fun, interactive activities that build all four core language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. No more drilling paper flashcards!
  • Grammar Reference: An extensive index of grammar materials rounds out the learning experience, providing both written and multimedia explanations of grammar rules and patterns.

Worried that you won’t be able to learn on your own? A customizable Learning Path allows you to choose what you want to learn, while an integrated analytics system tracks your progress, periodically prompting you to review material that you haven’t seen in a while. It’s like having a built-in teacher there to keep you on track toward your language-learning goals.

Best of all, Transparent Language Online works on any Internet-connected device, so you can learn from your laptop, phone, or tablet.

To learn more about Transparent Language Online and preview the program, swing by the library for a demo and to set up a free account. (If you use the library Zinio Magazines, you already have an account! Use the same email and password for both!) Access the program directly at Hot Topics – Databases A-Z or view the getting started videos at Hot Topics – How to Use the Library Databases

Feel free to contact us with any questions at ask@lvccld.org

#ClubRead Selection: Red Berries White Clouds Blue Sky Grades 3-5

red berriesRed Berries White Clouds Blue Sky by Sandra Dallas

It’s 1942: Tomi Itano, 12, is a second-generation Japanese American who lives in California with her family on their strawberry farm. Although her parents came from Japan and her grandparents still live there, Tomi considers herself an American. She doesn’t speak Japanese and has never been to Japan. But after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, things change. No Japs Allowed signs hang in store windows and Tomi’s family is ostracized. Things get much worse. Suspected as a spy, Tomi’s father is taken away. The rest of the Itano family is sent to an internment camp in Colorado. Many other Japanese American families face a similar fate. Tomi becomes bitter, wondering how her country could treat her and her family like the enemy. What does she need to do to prove she is an honorable American? Sandra Dallas shines a light on a dark period of American history in this story of a young Japanese American girl caught up in the prejudices and World War II.

Read about the author on Hot Topic – Club Read Kids

Club Read – Explore beyond the page!

explore_beyond_the_pageThis summer, come and explore beyond the page with Hot Topic – Club Read. Discover magazines, go on a scavenger hunt or explore a database. Use these reading ideas for counting your minutes for Club Read!