Prevent Summer Slide and Have Fun Doing It!


00-June2015HelpNowBainfuse HelpNow can help prevent the summer slide. Use SkillSurfer to keep up with what you learned this year or get a head start on school this fall. Love puzzles? With Flashbulb you can create your own crossword puzzles, flash cards, unscramble and more. Flashbulb is also great for those summer road trips!

Our Gale Databases get a new look and features! Take a look!


Gale 2015Starting today, you can benefit from a number of enhancements to the library’s premium databases GVRL and all resources within the InfoTrac and In Context* families, including the PowerSearch platform. These enhancements are designed to increase accessibility for those with disabilities like low vision or blindness, improve usability for both desktop and mobile researchers, and create a common user experience across some of the most popular resources.

Just a few of the improvements include:

  • A similar user experience across GVRL, InfoTrac, and In Context
  • Optimization for all screen sizes and devices
  • Improved workflow through placement and labeling of navigation elements
  • Increased accessibility through high-contrast banners and buttons
  • Better presentation of valuable page content

You can learn more about these enhancements at Gale 2015 Enhancements.

You will find Gale databases on the library’s Databases A-Z and Hot Topics pages.

Got Homework? Frustrated with Homework? Frustrated with Job Hunting?


01March2015HelpNowWhy struggle with homework or job hunting when there is free help available 7 days a week from 1 p.m. to 10 p.m.? Never used BrainFuse before? Visit with Jack from BrainFuse and he will show you how easy it is to turn homework or job hunting frustrations into success with HelpNow! What is HelpNow?

It’s for Students (all grade levels) and Job Hunters!

Get Math, Science, Reading and Writing or Resume help and Interview Coaching help!

When and where? It’s FREE!

  • West Charleston Library  – Mar 11, at 11:00 a.m. 6301 W. Charleston Blvd, LV, NV. 89146
  • Rainbow Library  –  Mar 11 at 2:00 p.m.   3150 N. Buffalo Dr. Las Vegas, NV 89128
  • Windmill Library – Virtual Library Lab – Mar 12 at 11:00 a.m.  7060 W Windmill Las Vegas, NV 89113
  • Sunrise Library – Mar 12 at 2:00 p.m.  5400 Harris Ave, Las Vegas, NV 89110

 

 

BrainFuse Loves Libraries! Do you love BrainFuse?


01 -BrainfuseLovesLibraries-HelpNowJobNowStudents who use BrainFuse, love it!  Just check out student comments below from January to see how much they love it!  If you haven’t tried BrainFuse why not give it a try? It’s FREE!

To get started with BrainFuse visit Databases A-Z and Hot Topics

Save the Date: Jack from BrainFuse is coming March 11th and 12th to a library near you. See the Events & Galleries section to find times and locations. He will show you how easy it is to use BrainFuse and JobNow and answer any questions you have.

PATRON COMMENTS
great application better then other websites i have used in the past it brought my grade from D to A brainfuse.com
getting real smart !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Thank you it helped out i need to use
Nice teacher
Im improvign alot
Rosy is the best tutor ever I love this website.
RECOMMEND TO ALL PEOPLE OF THE WORLD
It is the best I have never failed a page of homework!
You need longer sessions than 90 minutes. It’s just not long enough.
IT DOES NOT GET BETTER THAN THIS
I am so glad this is offered in my library. Brainfuse tutor’s have helped me with my school work, or I would be failing my classes. Every tutor I have worked with has always pushed me to try my best. I am very fortunate to have this website. I have been using this website since I was in 8th grade and now that I am approaching my senior year I am sad that I won’t have an excuse to go on here anymore. This website has been my savior! Keep up the good work! 🙂 and thank you!
🙂
This is awsome
Thank it is a very respectful website.
it was pretty cumfusing but know i got my work done easier and quicker. But i want this to be more easier at first.
Thank you for providing this, it honestly clears the things I don’t understand in class.
dear, brain fuse brain fuse was awsome like so awsome when I heard about this touter I screamed loud thank you, Devin Harris
Very helpful
I would have no idea about all of my schoolwork without this service. This service and its tutors are amazing!
this is my first time
t gtcvtg d
Rosy was the best tutor Ever. She was very clear what she said and i hope i will have her again!!! Thank you so much Rosy!!!
thanks for all your help I feel a little more confident in doing my algebra
i am not a student, i’m 45 and tranferd from wa sh. dc to las vegas. 26 years of service and they iatse local{720}are making me take a math test,2x my last chance feb 10 adding and subtracting fractions in feet inches and fractions, to lowest form and im not getting it, need major help
not a student have to take math test foy my job

Tips for Researching Your Family Tree. Start with Heritage Quest Online at the Library.


tips for tracing your family history1)    List what you already know
When you’re getting started, one of the most important things to remember is to work backwards. Many people want to start their research with a family member who was a Civil War soldier, or something similar, but that could lead you down the wrong line of descent. It is even more critical to work backward if your family surname is common. You don’t want to spend a lot of time researching only to find that you were tracing the wrong John Smith. The best approach is to simply start with yourself and work from the present day to the past.

2)    Interview relatives
This step appears to be easy, but can pose a possible setback if you have relatives who aren’t particularly chatty. Be sure to ask your family members whether anybody has already started researching the family history; this can eliminate duplicating work that may already be done.

If you should be so lucky, speak to the family member who started tracing the family history or get a copy of his or her research. This may uncover leads for you to research further. Older generations may know the occupations that family members held, where they are buried, and they may have other stories that you can search for in historical newspapers. This information can provide a place to start.

3)    Get death records
This goes back to working in reverse chronological order. The most recent record of an individual will be the death record. For this reason, death records are much more common than birth records. In the U.S., death records are kept on a state-by-state basis; therefore, some are available online and others require you to mail in a request to receive a copy of the death certificate. There will likely be a fee (which varies by state and/or county), and you may have to provide proof that you are related to the person whose record you are requesting due to privacy laws.

A death record will provide many clues about the individual: the names of parents, spouse, residence and and where they were buried, their occupation, religion, and even cause of death.

4)    Follow death record clues
Once you have the clues from the death record, you can narrow your research! Search birth records by date, in the county of the birth. The birth record will reveal more information to lead you down the right ancestral line.

It is important to keep in mind that while the death certificate can provide plenty of helpful hints, it is not always accurate and reliable. The person that died is not filling out the form, of course, so the information comes from the person who is providing the information on the deceased’s behalf.

5)    Search census records
The purpose of using a census record is to discover and validate where the person lived and who is in the family. Many people start their research with census records. The census lists the individuals living in the household – even relatives, servants, farmhands – and provides their name, age, gender, and birthplace. It may also give their occupation, and whether the head of household rents or own the home, and the value of the property.

Census records are the most popular documents in tracing family history, but sometimes for one reason or another, you may not find your family in census records. If that’s the case, there are other helpful records to try.

Many cities kept their own directories, backed by private enterprises, that listed the residents and their addresses. There are also the state censuses, which are not conducted in the same year as the federal census.

It may also be possible that you’re looking in the wrong county. County boundaries settled around 1920, but throughout the 1800’s and early 1900’s, boundaries often changed. HeritageQuest® Online provides a digital version of the Map Guide to the U.S. – US Federal Census 1790-1920, allowing you to look up county boundaries by both state and year.     For help with printing Census pages view Printing_Enlarged_Census_Images-Acrobat_Reader_8-9.

6)    Search local sources

Once you verify names and locations, you can start looking in the local publications for stories about your family and the area. Historical newspapers are great sources of personal stories, birth notices and obituaries.

Obituaries can offer rich details about the deceased’s life, including the names of other family members. However, not everything is available on the Internet. You may need to do some on-site research, and the local librarian can help.

7)    Don’t forget
Maps can provide many helpful details while tracing your family tree. Resources like Digital Sanborn® Maps and Historic Map Works Library Edition provide the size and type of the family home, business or property, and can reveal other possible ancestors who may be neighbors.

Don’t forget to check immigration records, as most of us have ancestors who immigrated to the United States at one point. Ancestry® Library Edition has passenger lists for all major ports and has digitized these immigration records. Also, don’t automatically assume that your family changed their surname when they immigrated. Instead, it may have been misspelled on the records.

Many of our male ancestors served in the military. Military records, like the service and pension records, are accessible in databases like Fold3, which includes fascinating stories and photos as well.

The more corroborating records you can find, the more genealogical proof you have that you’re following the right ancestral line.
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For more help, visit the library’s Hot Topic – Genealogy under subject heading General

With a lot of free resources and advice, your library is a great place to celebrate Family.